If Sharon is elected, Oslo is out of the window
But even an agreement of such limited ambition may prove outdated within weeks. Ariel Sharon, the man most likely to be voted Israel’s prime minister in the February elections, has made clear he’ll pull the plug on the attempted thaw. Polls show that the Likud leader is set to trounce Prime Minister Ehud Barak when Israel votes, and Sharon has already signaled that if he wins, any deals reached between Barak and Arafat aren’t worth the paper they’re written on. Sharon declared Wednesday that the Oslo Accord is an agreement that no longer exists. Even though he’d opposed Oslo, the last Likud prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, had agreed to abide by Israel’s undertakings in line with the accord (although in practice his strategy was simply to freeze the process). Sharon is vowing to go a lot further, trashing the framework within which the current agreements have been reached. Although he also spoke of how peace would require painful sacrifices, he explained that by this he meant that Israel was not going to recapture towns, such as Nablus and Jericho, already handed over to the Palestinians. But he has no intention of allowing Palestinian control over an inch of Jerusalem, or of closing down Israeli settlements in the West Bank.
Israeli observers believe that there’s still a chance Sharon can be beaten at the polls, but not by Barak. The prime minister would have to stand aside or be withdrawn as his party’s nominee to allow former prime minister Shimon Peres to stand in his place. Opinion polls show that whereas Sharon would trounce Barak, a Peres-Sharon contest would be a tight race. But if Sharon takes the reins after February 6, the document being finessed by Dennis Ross may become no more than the last will and testament of a dead peace process.

Bibliography
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